Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Chapter 6: Capacity and Deployment Planning
Single-Server and Farm Topology Comparison
There are no hard-and-fast rules as to how an Excel Services topology must be used. The combination of
operations and workbook features that you want to use will, for the most part, dictate the type of
deployment you need. The following table compares the single-server, small farm, medium farm, and large farm
topologies.
Criteria
Single- Server
Small Farm
Medium Farm
Large Farm
Concurrent
users for
Excel
Services
Low
Low
Medium
High
Workbooks
Not
calculationintensive
Not
calculationintensive
Not
calculationintensive
Calculationintensive
Number of
unique
workbooks loaded
by Excel
Services
Low
Low
Low
High
Workbook
external
data queries
Can return
small data sets
Can return
small data sets
Can return
small data sets
Can return
large data sets
Intranet and Extranet
Figure 6-5 shows an example of Excel Services in an intranet topology. The Excel Services applications
servers are behind a firewall separate from the front-end servers, SQL Server configuration, and content
database. This provides an additional security layer for the ECS located within the intranet, as well as
the external data sources that are isolated behind an additional firewall.
Figure 6-6 shows an example of Excel Services in an extranet topology. In this example, the Excel
Services application servers, SQL Server configuration, content database, and front-end servers are
together behind the perimeter firewall.
High-Performance Computing
Windows Compute Cluster Server (CCS) 2003 and Excel Services can be deployed together to take
advantage of the ability of CCS to run parallel, high performance computing (HPC) applications to solve
complex computations. In this topology, the installation of MOSS looks a lot like a small farm, where each
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