Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
EX 48
Excel Chapter 1 Creating a Worksheet and an Embedded Chart
Other Ways to Select Cells
As you will see in later chapters, in addition to using the Name box to select any
cell in a worksheet, you also can use it to assign names to a cell or range of cells. Excel
supports several additional ways to select a cell, as summarized in Table 1–3.
Find & Select
You can fi nd and select
cells based on their
content. Click the Find
& Select button on the
Home tab on the Ribbon.
Then, click the Go To
Special command. Choose
your desired option in
the Select area of the Go
To Special dialog box and
then click the OK button.
Table 1–3 Selecting Cells in Excel
Key, Box, or Command
Function
ALT + PAGE DOWN
Selects the cell one worksheet window to the right and moves the worksheet
window accordingly.
ALT + PAGE UP
Selects the cell one worksheet window to the left and moves the worksheet
window accordingly.
ARROW
Selects the adjacent cell in the direction of the arrow on the key.
CTRL + ARROW
Selects the border cell of the worksheet in combination with the arrow keys
and moves the worksheet window accordingly. For example, to select the
rightmost cell in the row that contains the active cell, press CTRL + RIGHT ARROW .
You also can press the END key, release it, and then press the appropriate
arrow key to accomplish the same task.
CTRL + HOME
Selects cell A1 or the cell one column and one row below and to the right of
frozen titles and moves the worksheet window accordingly.
Find command on Edit menu or
SHIFT + F5
Finds and selects a cell that contains specifi c contents that you enter in the
Find dialog box. If necessary, Excel moves the worksheet window to display
the cell. You also can press CTRL + F to display the Find dialog box.
Go To command on Edit menu
or F5
Selects the cell that corresponds to the cell reference you enter in the Go To
dialog box and moves the worksheet window accordingly. You also can press
CTRL + G to display the Go To dialog box.
HOME
Selects the cell at the beginning of the row that contains the active cell and
moves the worksheet window accordingly.
Name box
Selects the cell in the workbook that corresponds to the cell reference you
enter in the Name box.
PAGE DOWN
Selects the cell down one worksheet window from the active cell and moves
the worksheet window accordingly.
PAGE UP
Selects the cell up one worksheet window from the active cell and moves the
worksheet window accordingly.
Decide on the type of chart needed.
Excel includes 11 chart types from which you can choose including column, line, pie, bar,
area, X Y (scatter), stock, surface, doughnut, bubble, and radar. The type of chart you choose
depends on the type of data that you have, how much data you have, and the message you
want to convey.
A column chart is a good way to compare values side-by-side. A Clustered Column chart
can go even further in comparing values across categories. In the case of the Walk and Rock
Music quarterly sales data, comparisons of product types within each region can be made
side-by-side with a Clustered Column chart.
Plan
Ahead
Establish where to position and how to format the chart.
When possible, try to position charts so that both the data and chart appear on the
screen on the worksheet together and so that the data and chart can be printed in the
most readable manner possible. By placing the chart below the data on the Walk and
Rock Music 1st Quarter Sales worksheet, both of these goals are accomplished.
When choosing/selecting colors for a chart, consider the color scheme of the rest of the
worksheet. The chart should not present colors that are in stark contrast to the rest of the
worksheet. If the chart will be printed in color, minimize the amount of dark colors on
the chart so that the chart both prints quickly and preserves ink.
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