Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
EX 118
Excel Chapter 2 Formulas, Functions, Formatting, and Web Queries
To Apply a Percent Style Format and Use the Increase Decimal Button
The next step is to format the percent gain/loss in column J. Currently, Excel displays the numbers in column J
as a decimal fraction (for example, 0.284874 in cell J4). The following steps format the range J4:J16 to the Percent style
format with two decimal places.
Increase
Decimal button
1
Select the range J4:J16.
Click the Percent Style button on
the Ribbon to display the numbers
in column J as a rounded whole
percent.
What is the result of clicking the
Percent Style button?
The Percent Style button instructs
Excel to display a value as a
percentage, determined by
multiplying the cell entry by 100,
rounding the result to the nearest
percent, and adding a percent
sign. For example, when cell J4 is
formatted using the Percent Style
and Increase Decimal buttons,
Excel displays the actual value
0.284874 as 28.49%.
Percent Style button
Decrease
Decimal button
Excel displays range
J4:J16 using Percent
style format with two
decimal places
2
Click the Increase Decimal button
on the Ribbon two times to display
the numbers in column J with
the Percent style format and two
decimal places (Figure 2–47).
Figure 2–47
Other Ways
1. Right-click range, click
Format Cells on shortcut
menu, click Number
tab, click Percentage
in Category list, select
format, click OK button
2. Press CTRL+1, click
Number tab, click
Percentage in Category
list, select format, click
OK button
3. Press CTRL+SHIFT+
PERCENT SIGN (%)
Conditional Formatting
The next step is to emphasize the negative percentages in column J by formatting
them to appear with a tinted background. The Conditional Formatting button on the
Ribbon will be used to complete this task.
Excel lets you apply formatting that appears only when the value in a cell meets
conditions that you specify. This type of formatting is called conditional formatting .
You can apply conditional formatting to a cell, a range of cells, the entire worksheet, or
the entire workbook. Usually, you apply conditional formatting to a range of cells that
contains values you want to highlight, if conditions warrant. For example, you can instruct
Excel to change the color of the background of a cell if the value in the cell meets a condition,
such as being less than 0 as shown in Figure 2–48.
A condition , which is made up of two values and a relational operator, is true or
false for each cell in the range. If the condition is true, then Excel applies the formatting.
If the condition is false, then Excel suppresses the formatting. What makes conditional
formatting so powerful is that the cell’s appearance can change as you enter new values in
the worksheet.
C6161_EXC_02.4c.indd 118
C6161_EXC_02.4c.indd 118
3/6/07 3:29:08 PM
3/6/07 3:29:08 PM
 
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