Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
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2
View the query results
(Figure 2–74).
3
Close the query.
Do not save your changes.
recruiter
number 21
average amount
paid for clients
of recruiter 21
average amount
paid for clients
of recruiter 24
recruiter
number 24
recruiter
number 27
average amount
paid for clients
of recruiter 27
Figure 2–74
Crosstab Queries
Certifi cation
The Microsoft Certifi ed
Application Specialist
(MCAS) program provides
an opportunity for you
to obtain a valuable
industry credential—
proof that you have
the Access 2007 skills
required by employers.
For more information,
see Appendix F or
visit the Access 2007
Certifi cation Web page
(scsite.com/ac2007/cert).
Crosstab queries are useful for summarizing data. A crosstab query calculates a statistic
(for example, sum, average, or count) for data that is grouped by two different types of
information. One of the types will appear down the side of the resulting datasheet, and the
other will appear across the top.
For example, if you have determined that a query must summarize the sum of the
amounts paid grouped by both city and recruiter number, you could have cities as the row
headings, that is, down the side. You could have recruiter numbers as the column
headings, that is, across the top. The entries within the data sheet represent the total of the
amounts paid. Figure 2–75 shows a crosstab in which the total of amount paid is grouped
by both city and recruiter number with cities down the left-hand side and recruiter
numbers across the top. For example, the entry in the row labeled Fort Stewart and in the
column labeled 21 represents the total of the amount paid by all clients of recruiter 21
who are located in Fort Stewart.
column headings
(recruiter numbers)
row
headings
(cities)
crosstab
sum of amounts
paid by clients of
recruiter 21 located
in Fort Stewart
sum of amounts
paid by all clients
in Fort Stewart
Figure 2–75
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