Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
An Access database can contain thousands of objects, fields, controls, and other items,
and keeping track of their names and what they represent is a difficult task. Consequently,
you should use naming conventions that identify the type and purpose of each item in an
Access database. You can use naming conventions that identify items generally or very
specifically.
For objects, include a prefix tag to identify the type of object, as shown in Figure A-21.
In each example in Figure A-21, the final object name consists of a three-character tag
prefixed to the base object name. The form name of frmEmployeesAndPositions, for
example, consists of the frm tag and the EmployeesAndPositions base form name.
Figure A-21
Object naming tags
Object type
Tag
Example
Form
frm
frmEmployeesAndPositions
Macro
mcr
mcrCalculations
Module
bas
basCalculations
Query
qry
qryEmployee
Report
rpt
rptEmployeesAndPositions
Table
tbl
tblEmployee
The tags in Figure A-21 identify each object type in general. If you want to identify object
types more specifically, you could expand Figure A-21 to include tags such as fsub for a sub-
form, qxtb for a crosstab query, tlkp for a lookup table, rsub for a subreport, and so on.
For controls in forms and reports, a general naming convention uses lbl as a prefix tag
for labels and ctl as a prefix tag for other types of controls. For more specific naming con-
ventions for controls, you’d use a specific prefix tag for each type of control. Figure A-22
shows the prefix tag for some common controls in forms and reports.
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