Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
example of a formula that uses the DATEDIF function (it assumes cells A1 and A2 contain a date). The formula
returns the number of complete years between those two dates.
=DATEDIF(A1,A2,”y”)
The following table displays valid codes for the third argument. You must enclose the codes in quotation marks.
The start_date argument must be earlier than the end_date argument, or the function returns an error.
Here's a similar formula that returns the day of the year for the current date:
=TODAY()-DATE(YEAR(TODAY()),1,0)
The following formula returns the number of days remaining in the year from a particular date (assumed to be
in cell A1):
=DATE(YEAR(A1),12,31)-A1
When you enter this formula, Excel applies date formatting to the cell. You need to apply a non-date number
format to view the result as a number.
To convert a particular day of the year (for example, the 90th day of the year) to an actual date in a specified
year, use the formula that follows. This formula assumes that the year is stored in cell A1 and that the day of the
year is stored in cell B1.
=DATE(A1,1,B1)
Determining the day of the week
The WEEKDAY function accepts a date argument and returns an integer between 1 and 7 that corresponds to
the day of the week. The following formula, for example, returns 3 because the first day of the year 2013 falls
on a Tuesday:
=WEEKDAY(DATE(2013,1,1))
Search JabSto ::




Custom Search