Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Some Ribbon commands display a dialog box, from which you can specify options or issue other commands.
You'll find two general classes of dialog boxes in Excel:
Modal dialog boxes: When a modal dialog box is displayed, it must be closed to execute the commands. An
example is the Format Cells dialog box. None of the options you specify is executed until you click OK. Or
click the Cancel button to close the dialog box without making any changes.
Modeless dialog boxes: These are stay-on-top dialog boxes. An example is the Find and Replace dialog
box. Modeless dialog boxes usually have a Close button rather than OK and Cancel buttons.
Some Excel dialog boxes use a notebook tab metaphor, which makes a single dialog box function as several dif-
ferent dialog boxes. An example is the Format Cells dialog box, shown in Figure 1-4.
Figure 1-4: Tabbed dialog boxes make many options accessible without overwhelming the user.
Customizing the UI
The Quick Access toolbar is a set of tools that the user can customize. By default, the Quick Access toolbar
contains three tools: Save, Undo, and Redo. If you find that you use a particular Ribbon command frequently,
right-click the command and choose Add to Quick Access Toolbar. You can make other changes to the Quick
Access toolbar from the Quick Access Toolbar tab of the Excel Options dialog box. To access this dialog box,
right-click the Quick Access toolbar and choose Customize Quick Access Toolbar.
You can also customize the Ribbon by using the Customize Ribbon tab of the Excel Options dialog box. Choose
File Options to display the Excel Options dialog box.
You can customize the Ribbon in these ways:
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