Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Managing Worksheet Views
Frozen Row
Heading
Scroll to the Data
You Want to View
Frozen Column
Headings
Splitting the Excel Screen
Splitting the Excel window is similar to freezing
row and column headings, because it enables
you to see non-contiguous parts of the
worksheet at the same time. The way splitting differs
is that its focus is not on row and column labels.
Instead, splitting can be used to literally split the
window into up to four viewing panes, divided
horizontally and vertically), so you can see four
different areas of the worksheet at once.
When you split the screen, up to two split bars
appear as shown in Figure 6-32. If you click a
cell in the first row for example, and then split
the screen, a split bar appears to the left of this
cell, vertically splitting the screen in two. These
two vertical panes scroll together when you scroll
up or down in either pane, but independently if
you scroll left or right within a pane. If you click
a cell in the first column instead, a split bar
appears above the cell, splitting the screen
horizontally in two. The two horizontal panes scroll
together when you scroll left or right in either
pane, but independently when you scroll up or
down. If you click any other cell, the screen is
split both horizontally and vertically (above and
to the left of the cell you click). Two of the four
panes scroll together when you scroll left or
right/up or down.
Figure 6-31
Freeze row and column headings so you can
scroll anywhere within a large worksheet.
Tip
If your row headings are located in
column A, click the Freeze Panes button on
the View tab and select Freeze First
Column to freeze them without clicking
any particular cell first. Select Freeze Top
Row from the pop-up menu to freeze
column headings (assuming they are located
in row 1 of the worksheet).
 
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