Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Creating Formulas
Creating a Compound Formula
A compound formula contains more than one
mathematical operator. For example, suppose
that you want to calculate the amount of black
bean taquitos sold in August, but it’s a little
more complicated than simply knowing how
many taquitos you had at the beginning and end
of the month. You need to account for deliveries
during the month, and any returns for damaged
packaging/spoiled food. In order to calculate the
actual number of taquitos you had available for
sale, you take the opening inventory, add any
deliveries, and subtract the returns. From this
new balance, you subtract the closing inventory
(the number of taquitos left over at the end of
the month) to calculate the number of taquitos
sold. Your formula to calculate the total taquitos
available might look like this: =B12+C12–D12
(assuming B12 contains the number of taquitos
on-hand at the beginning of August, C12
contains the number of taquitos delivered during
the month, and D12 contains the number of
taquitos returned). Follow these steps to create
your own compound formula:
5. Click or type the address of the next cell you
want to reference in the formula, or type a
value. For example, click cell C11.
6. Type another operator such as + (addition),
– (subtraction), * (multiplication), or
/ (division) to indicate the next type of
calculation you want Excel to perform. For
example, type +. The formula now looks like
this: =B11+C11.
7.
Click or type the address of the next cell you
want to reference in the formula, or type a
value. For example, click cell D11.
8. Repeat Steps 6 and 7 as needed to complete
the formula. The formula now looks like this:
=B11+C11–D11.
9. Press Enter. The result of the calculation
appears in the cell you selected in Step 1,
as shown in Figure 2-5.
1. Click the cell in which you want the result of
the formula to appear. In this example, click
cell E11.
2. Type an equals (=) sign.
3. Click the cell you want to reference in the
formula, or type its address. You can type a
value (such as .25) instead of a cell address if
you like. For example, type =B11.
4. Type an operator such as + (addition),
– (subtraction), * (multiplication), or
/ (division) to indicate the type of calculation
you want Excel to perform. The formula now
looks like this: =B11+.
Figure 2-5
Compound formulas contain multiple
mathematical operators.
 
 
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