Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
You can also audit your worksheet by identifying cells with formulas that use a value from
a given cell. For example, you might use one region’s daily package total in a formula
that calculates the average number of packages delivered for all regions on a given day.
Cells that use another cell’s value in their calculations are known as dependents , meaning
that they depend on the value in the other cell to derive their own value. As with tracing
precedents, you can click the Formulas tab, and then in the Formula Auditing group, click
Trace Dependents to have Excel draw blue arrows from the active cell to those cells that
have calculations based on that value.
If the cells identified by the tracer arrows aren’t the correct cells, you can hide the arrows
and correct the formula. To hide the tracer arrows on a worksheet, display the Formulas
tab, and then in the Formula Auditing group, click Remove Arrows.
If you prefer to have the elements of a formula error presented as text in a dialog box,
you can use the Error Checking dialog box to view the error and the formula in the cell in
which the error occurs. To display the Error Checking dialog box, display the Formulas tab,
and then in the Formula Auditing group, click the Error Checking button. You can use the
controls in the Error Checking dialog box to move through the formula one step at a time,
to choose to ignore the error, or to move to the next or the previous error. If you click the
Options button in the dialog box, you can also use the controls in the Excel Options dialog
box to change how Excel determines what is an error and what isn’t.
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