Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Formatting Text
Table 7-6 Keyboard Shortcuts for Formatting Characters
Action
Keyboard Shortcut
Open the Font dialog box
Ctrl+Shift+F
Change to Symbol font
Ctrl+Shift+Q
Increase font size
Ctrl+Shift+>
Decrease font size
Ctrl+Shift+<
Increase font size by 1 point
Ctrl+]
Decrease font size by 1 point
Ctrl+[
Turn bold on/off
Ctrl+B
Turn italics on/off
Ctrl+I
Turn underlining on/off
Ctrl+U
Turn word underlining (not spaces) on/off
Ctrl+Shift+W
Turn double-underlining on/off
Ctrl+Shift+D
Turn superscript on/off
Ctrl+Shift+Plus
Turn subscript on/off
Ctrl+=
Turn small caps format on/off
Ctrl+Shift+K
Turn all caps format on/off
Ctrl+Shift+A
Turn hidden text on/off
Ctrl+Shift+H
Clear all manual character formatting
Ctrl+Spacebar
Most options in the Font dialog box need no further explanation, but some people are
unfamiliar with the following:
Small Caps In this format, capital letters appear as they always do, but lowercase
letters appear as smaller versions of the capitals— l ike t his .
All Caps As you would expect, in this format all letters appear as capital letters.
The important thing to note is that the character codes do not change; Word merely
changes the way lowercase letters are displayed. This difference means that if you
turn off the All Caps format (or change to a style that doesn’t have All Caps turned
on), all the text reverts to its previous capitalization. Conversely, if you actually
change case (by using the Change Case option in the Font group on the Home tab,
or by using the Shift+F3 shortcut), the original capitalization is lost.
Hidden Text with this format disappears altogether except when you select Show/
Hide ¶ (in the Paragraph group on the Home tab) or press Ctrl+*. Hidden text is
handy for notes to yourself that you don’t want to include in printed documents. (By
default, hidden text doesn’t print, even when it’s displayed on the screen. To change
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