Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Chapter 20: PowerPoint 2010 Inside Out
CHAPTER 20
PowerPoint 2010 Inside Out
Broadcasting a Presentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 649
Saving and Reusing Slides and Themes . . . . . . . . . . . . . 654
Creating Custom Slide Shows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 657
Working Collaboratively on a Presentation . . . . . . . . . . 661
Laying the Groundwork for an Expert Presentation . . . 665
Creating a Photo Album with PowerPoint . . . . . . . . . . . 670
Turning Your Presentation into a Video . . . . . . . . . . . . . 673
Our Favorite PowerPoint Tweaks and Tips . . . . . . . . . . . 674
Microsoft PowerPoint 2010 is a program that you can use to make
professionallooking presentations without a lot of effort or experience. Using just the
techniques we covered in the previous chapters, you can create presentations that
effectively communicate your ideas. Yet there’s much more to PowerPoint; in fact, it has
spawned a new job title in some companies: Presentation Development Specialist.
In this chapter, we look at ways to save and reuse your work in PowerPoint, including
themes, slides, and layouts. We also look at some features usually reserved for the experts,
like working with master views and creating custom slide shows. We begin the chapter by
describing one of the coolest new features in PowerPoint 2010, the ability to broadcast a
presentation over the Internet without requiring any special software on viewers’
computers. Later, we cover other methods for sharing your presentations.
Whether you develop presentations professionally or are an occasional PowerPoint user, we
think you’ll find these features interesting and useful.
Broadcasting a Presentation
With the high cost of travel, more and more people are foregoing face-to-face meetings in
favor of working remotely, sometimes with teams located around the world. Many families
have members that are scattered far and wide as well. As a result, the need for easier
communication is increasing every year. Years ago, businesses began to respond to this need
by using clunky video-conferencing systems. The systems worked, but they were expensive.
Then came services that allowed you to broadcast your presentations online. They worked,
too, but these services were also expensive and most required installation and
configuration of software on each participant’s computer.
Now there’s a better way: You can use the broadcasting feature in PowerPoint 2010 to
share presentations with up to 50 coworkers, family, or friends. As the presenter, all you
need is PowerPoint 2010 and a Windows Live ID. (Broadcast services other than the default
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