Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
What Inserting Does to Formulas
Figure 5–45. Here, columns C through E have been selected; thus, the three new columns will appear to the right
of column C.
You can then utilize either of the two insert methods just described (i.e., clicking Insert or
Insert Sheet Columns). For rows, select multiple rows directly beneath where you want the
new rows to appear.
What Inserting Does to Formulas
Inserting columns and rows may or may not impact existing formulas on the
spreadsheet. If cell D12 contains
=AVERAGE(A12:C12)
and you insert a column to the left of column D, the expression won’t be rewritten. It will
continue to read
=AVERAGE(A12:C12)
, even though it now finds itself in cell E12. Excel
tries to maintain the original formula relationships in the face of row and column
movement. And that means that if you were to move all the values in cells A12:C12 to
A5:C5 instead, you’d see
=AVERAGE(A5:C5)
Again, that’s because Excel assumes you still want to compute the average of those
numbers, even though they’ve be moved.
Deleting Columns and Rows
The general approach to carrying out column or row deletions is, again, to select the
columns or rows you want to delete using the selection techniques just described.
Again, you can call upon either of the two insert methods, but this time of course you’ll
click Delete (see Figure 5–46).
 
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