Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Figure 16-1.
A simple two-dimensional report contains summary data indexed by two fields.
If you want to represent a report with three fields, you need to envision a cube where the
intersection of any row, column, and depth variable will produce a single summary value. To
make a three-dimensional report easier to deal with, you can “flatten” the report by cutting
the cube into multiple slices along the depth axis and representing the third dimension at the
top of each page of the report, as is often done when you create reports in Microsoft Access.
Visualizing a report with more than three variables is something that many humans aren’t
capable of doing, but it’s easy to flatten a report with any number of variables. Simply choose
the fields for the rows and columns for the flattened report, and display the values of the
other fields at the top of each page.
The data that you would use for a PivotTable is typically organized as a series of rows known
as facts , which consists of a collection of keys and measures . A measure is a numeric value
such as the number of sales or the total dollar value of the sales. A key, which can be com­
posed of one or more columns, characterizes a corresponding measure and usually answers
questions such as when the sales were made or to whom the sales were made. A key field
(or collection of fields) always contains a unique value for each row in a table, allowing Excel
to identify the corresponding measure. In the following table, the Month, Week, Weekday,
Day, and Hour fields comprise the key, while the Sales field contains a measure.
Month
Week Weekday
Day
Hour
Sales
January 1
Mon
1
9
147
January 1
Tue
2
9
161
January 1
Wed
3
9
182
January 1
Thu
4
9
201
Search JabSto ::




Custom Search