Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Chapter 26
Excel and the Extensible ￿
Markup Language (XML)￿
Introducing Data Lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 539
Adding XML to a Workbook Manually . . 550€
Creating XML Schemas. . . . . . . . . . . . . 546
Adding XML to a Worksheet €
Creating XML Data Files . . . . . . . . . . . . 549
Programmatically. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 553€
Support for XML, including the ability to save files as XML documents, was introduced in
Microsoft Office XP, but the technology is one of the focal points of Office 2003. If you work
in an enterprise that exchanges data with other organizations in the form of purchase orders,
parts data, financial data, or product catalogs, you can use XML to transfer the data among
your colleagues and suppliers regardless of the program used to create the data.
In this chapter, you’ll learn how to:
Create data lists manually and programmatically
Create XML schemas and data files
Associate XML schemas with workbooks
Import and export XML data manually and programmatically
Associate schema elements with columns
Associate schemas with existing data lists
Introducing Data Lists
In Microsoft Excel Version 2002 and earlier versions, you needed to create a data list to use
certain functions such as sorting and filtering data or creating a PivotTable. Though the
concept of a data list was only loosely defined in the help system, the bottom line was that
you needed to have a series of columns, with headers, and a series of rows with values for the
columns. Figure 26-1 shows a data list of suppliers derived from the Suppliers table in the
Northwind sample database (included with Microsoft Access).
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