Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
USE GET.CELL TO HIGHLIGHT NON-FORMULA CELLS
Figure 17. You can convert OR functions to addition and test whether the result is
TRUE .
Summary: Understanding the Boolean logic facts can simplify your IF
calculations. Remember that FALSE is 0 , AND is * , OR is + , and everything
else is TRUE .
USE GET.CELL TO HIGHLIGHT
NON-FORMULA CELLS
Challenge: You want to highlight all the cells on a worksheet that do not contain
formulas.
Solution: Before VBA, macros were written in an old macro language now
known as XLM. That language offered a GET.CELL function, which provides
far more information than the current CELL function. In fact, GET.CELL can tell
you more than fi ve dozen different attributes of a cell.
GET.CELL is cool, but there is one gotcha. You cannot enter this function
directly in a cell. You have to defi ne a name to hold the function and then
refer to the name in the cell. For example, to fi nd out whether cell A1 contains
a formula, you use =GET.CELL(48,Sheet1!A1) . However, you need
something more generic than this for the conditional formatting formula. Using
=INDIRECT("RC",False) is a handy way to refer to the cell in which the
formula exists. Thus, the formula to tell if the current cell contains a formula
is:
=GET.CELL(48,INDIRECT("RC",False))
 
 
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