Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Saving or updating a document
Every so often as you continue to work on your document, you should save again. That way, any
changes you’ve made since the last time you saved are remembered and recorded on the computer’s
storage system permanently. I generally save my documents dozens of times a day — usually, when
the phone rings or when I need to step away and the cat is lurking too closely to the keyboard or,
often, when I’m just bored.
To resave a document that has already been saved to disk, click the File tab and choose the Save
command from the File screen. You get no feedback, and the Save As dialog box doesn’t show up.
That’s because you already gave the file a name; the Save command merely updates the existing file.
The fastest way to save a document is to use the Ctrl+S keyboard shortcut.
You can also click the Save icon on the Quick Access Toolbar to save a document to
disk.
The most bizarre command for saving a document? Shift+F12. Weird.
Forgetting to save before you quit
When you’re done writing in Word, you close the document, close the window, or quit Word
outright. No matter how you call it quits, when the document hasn’t yet been saved or was changed
since the last save, you’re asked to save one last time. Here are your options:
Save: The document is saved. If you’ve been bad and haven’t saved the document even once, the
Save As screen appears. See the earlier section, “Saving a document the first time.”
Don’t Save: The document isn’t officially saved, but it may be available for later recovery. See the
later section, “Recover a Draft,” to see how that works.
Cancel: Word returns you to your document for more editing and stuff.
I recommend choosing the Save option.
Open a Document
Saving a document means nothing unless you have a way to retrieve it. You have several ways to
open a document that was previously saved as a file. This section mulls the possibilities.
Using the Open command
Open is the standard computer command used to fetch a document that already exists on the
computer’s storage system. You use Open to hunt down documents that were previously saved and open
them like you’re unwrapping a present. The document is then displayed in Word’s window as
though it has always been there.
 
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