Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Adjusting task link relationships
Start-to-start (SS)
The start date of the predecessor task determines the start date
of the successor task.
Finish-to-finish (FF) The finish date of the predecessor task determines the finish
date of the successor task.
Start-to-finish (SF) The start date of the predecessor task determines the finish
date of the successor task.
When you link tasks in Project, they are given a finish-to-start relationship by default. This
is fine for many tasks, but you will most likely change some task relationships as you
inetune a plan. The following are some examples of tasks that require relationships other than
finish-to-start:
You can start setting pages as soon as you start illustration work on a topic project (a
start-to-start relationship). This reduces the overall time required to complete the two
tasks, because they are completed in parallel.
Planning the editorial work for a topic can begin before the manuscript is complete,
but it cannot be finished until the manuscript is complete. You want the two tasks to
finish at the same time (a finish-to-finish relationship).
Task relationships should reflect the sequence in which work should be performed. After
you have established the correct task relationships, you can fine-tune your schedule by
entering overlap (called lead time ) or delay (called lag time ) between the finish or start
dates of predecessor and successor tasks.
When two tasks have a finish-to-start relationship
Lead time causes the successor task to begin before its predecessor task concludes.
Lag time causes the successor task to begin sometime after its predecessor task
concludes.
The following is an illustration of how lead and lag time affect task relationships. Assume
that you initially planned the following three tasks using finish-to-start relationships.
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