Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Chapter 6: How to work a worksheet
CHAPTER 6
How to work a worksheet
Moving around regions...........................131
Understanding selection ..........................134
Techniques for entering data ......................143
Managing worksheets ............................154
Viewing worksheets ..............................159
Protecting worksheets............................165
IN THIS CHAPTER , we cover the basics, including moving around within the massive
worksheet grid, entering and selecting data, and working with multiple worksheets and
protecting their contents. You probably already know many of these techniques, but here
you’ll also learn alternative methods. You might find a better—or faster—way to do
something you do frequently.
Moving around regions
A region is a rectangular range of cell entries, or a block of “filled” cells. In Figure 6-1, the
range A3:E7 is a region, as are the ranges G3:H7, A9:E10, and G9:H10. (Strictly speaking, cell
A1 is a one-cell region, too.) Cell H10 is considered to be within a region, even though it’s
empty.
The active area of the worksheet is the selection rectangle that encompasses all regions—
that is, all the filled cells in the active worksheet—which in Figure 6-1 is A1:H10.
The techniques you can use to navigate regions are helpful if you typically work with large
tables of data. Getting to the bottom row of a 500-row table is easier when you don’t have
to use the scroll bars.
Note
The small square in the lower-right corner of the active cell is the ill handle . If the ill
handle isn’t visible on your screen, it means it isn’t turned on. To turn it on, click the
File tab, click Options, click the Advanced category, and select the Enable Fill Handle
And Cell Drag-And-Drop check box.
131
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