Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Techniques for entering data
Selecting row or column differences
The Row Differences and Column Differences options in the Go To Special dialog box
compare the entries in a range of cells to spot potential inconsistencies. To use these debugging
options, select the range before displaying the Go To Special dialog box. The position of
the active cell in your selection determines which cells Excel uses to make its comparisons.
When searching for row differences, Excel compares the cells in the selection with the cells
in the same column as the active cell. When searching for column differences, Excel
compares the cells in the selection with the cells in the same row as the active cell.
In addition to other variations, the Row Differences and Column Differences options look
for differences in references and select cells that don’t conform to the comparison cell.
They also verify that all the cells in the selected range contain the same type of entries. For
example, if the comparison cell contains a SUM function, Excel lags any cells that contain a
function, formula, or value other than SUM. If the comparison cell contains a constant text
or numeric value, Excel lags any cells in the selected range that don’t match the
comparison value. The options, however, are not case-sensitive.
Techniques for entering data
Excel accepts two types of cell entries: constants and formulas. Constants fall into three
main categories: numeric values, text values (also called labels or strings ), and date/time
values. Excel also recognizes two special types of constants, called logical values and error
values .
For more about date/time values, see Chapter 15, “Formatting and calculating date and time.”
Making entries in cells and in the formula bar
In “classic” versions of Excel, all entries and edits happened only in the formula bar; later,
incell editing was added, and subtle behavioral differences still remain between these modes
of entry.
To make an entry in a cell, just select the cell and start typing. As you type, the entry
appears both in the formula bar and in the active cell. The lashing vertical bar in the active
cell is called the insertion point .
After you finish typing, you must press Enter to lock in the entry to store it permanently
in the cell. Pressing Enter normally causes the active cell to move down one row. You can
change this so that when you press Enter, either the active cell doesn’t change or it moves
to an adjacent cell in another direction. Click the File tab, click Options, select the Advanced
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