Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Techniques for entering data
Entering simple numeric and text values
An entry that includes only the numerals 0 through 9 and certain special characters—such
as + – E e ( ) . , $ % and /—is a numeric value. An entry that includes almost any other
character is a text value. Table 6-4 lists some examples of numeric and text values.
TABLE 6-4 Examples of numeric and text values
Numeric values
Text values
123
Sales
123.456
B-1
$1.98
Eleven
1%
123 Main Street
1.23E+12
No. 324
Using special characters
A number of characters have special effects in Excel. Here are some guidelines for using
special characters:
If you begin a numeric entry with a plus sign, Excel drops the plus sign.
If you begin a numeric entry with a minus sign, Excel interprets the entry as a
negative number and retains the sign.
In a numeric entry, the characters E and e specify an exponent used in scientific
notation. For example, Excel interprets 1E6 as 1,000,000 (1 times 10 to the sixth power),
which is displayed in Excel as 1.00E+06. To enter a negative exponential number, type
a minus sign before the exponent. For example, 1E–6 (1 times 10 to the negative
sixth power) equals .000001 and is displayed in Excel as 1.00E–06.
Excel interprets numeric constants enclosed in parentheses as negative numbers,
which is a common accounting practice. For example, Excel interprets (100) as –100.
You can use decimal points and commas as you normally would. When you type
numbers that include commas as separators, however, the commas appear in the
cell but not in the formula bar. This is the same effect as when you apply one of the
built-in Excel Number formats. For example, if you type 1,234.56 , the value 1234.56
appears in the formula bar.
If you begin a numeric entry with a dollar sign ($), Excel assigns a Currency format
to the cell. For example, if you type $123456 , Excel displays $123,456 in the cell and
123456 in the formula bar. In this case, Excel adds the comma to the worksheet
display because it’s part of the Currency format.
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