Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Chapter 19: Designing charts
CHAPTER 19
Designing charts
text
Selecting data for your chart ......................667
Creating a new chart .............................668
Changing the chart type ..........................672
Assigning a series to a secondary axis ..............674
Switching rows and columns ......................676
Choosing a chart layout ..........................678
Choosing a chart style ............................678
Moving the chart to a separate chart sheet..........679
Adding, editing, and removing a chart title..........680
Adding, editing, and removing a legend ............681
Adding and positioning data labels ................682
Adding a data table ..............................682
Adding and removing gridlines ....................682
Working with axes ...............................683
Modifying a chart’s data ..........................690
Adding moving averages and other trendlines.......693
Adding error bars ................................694
WHEN you create a chart in Microsoft Excel, two new tabs appear on the ribbon
under the heading Chart Tools. The first of these tabs, Design, offers options
related to the structure of the chart—the type of chart, the presence or absence
of various chart elements, the location of the chart, and other similar matters. The second
new tab, Format, is concerned with the appearance of the chart.
The current chapter and the one that follows adhere more or less to this framework,
although the distinction between structure and appearance is by no means hard and fast.
We’ll look first at design issues, and then follow in Chapter 20, “Formatting charts,” with
matters of format and style. The third chapter in this section—Chapter 21, “Using
sparklines”—looks at sparklines , miniature charts that you can use to depict data graphically
within the confines of single worksheet cells.
Selecting data for your chart
The first step in creating a chart is to select some data. If you’re plotting all the cells in a
contiguous block of cells, you don’t have to select the entire block; select any cell within the
block, and Excel knows what to do. If, on the other hand, you want to plot only certain rows
and columns within the range, you need to select those rows and columns explicitly.
Under some conditions, it’s advantageous to set up your source data as a table (by
selecting a cell within it and pressing Ctrl+T or Ctrl+L) before creating a chart from it:
If you plot data in a table and subsequently add new rows or columns to the table,
Excel automatically incorporates those rows or columns into the chart.
667
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