Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Office 2010 and Windows 7
Table 1 explains how to perform a variety of mouse operations. Some programs also
use keys in combination with the mouse to perform certain actions. For example, when
you hold down the ctrl key while rolling the mouse wheel, text on the screen becomes
larger or smaller based on the direction you roll the wheel. The function of the mouse
buttons and the wheel varies depending on the program.
Table 1 Mouse Operations
Operation
Mouse Action
Example*
Point
Move the mouse until the pointer on the desktop is positioned on the
item of choice.
Position the pointer on the screen.
Click
Press and release the primary mouse button, which usually is the left
mouse button.
Select or deselect items on the screen or start
a program or program feature.
Right-click
Press and release the secondary mouse button, which usually is the
right mouse button.
Display a shortcut menu.
Double-click
Quickly press and release the left mouse button twice without moving
the mouse.
Start a program or program feature.
Triple-click
Quickly press and release the left mouse button three times without
moving the mouse.
Select a paragraph.
Drag
Point to an item, hold down the left mouse button, move the item to the
desired location on the screen, and then release the left mouse button.
Move an object from one location to another
or draw pictures.
Right-drag
Point to an item, hold down the right mouse button, move the item to the
desired location on the screen, and then release the right mouse button.
Display a shortcut menu after moving an object
from one location to another.
Rotate wheel
Roll the wheel forward or backward.
Scroll vertically (up and down).
Free-spin wheel
Whirl the wheel forward or backward so that it spins freely on its own.
Scroll through many pages in seconds.
Press wheel
Press the wheel button while moving the mouse.
Scroll continuously.
Tilt wheel
Press the wheel toward the right or left.
Scroll horizontally (left and right).
Press thumb
button
Press the button on the side of the mouse with your thumb.
Move forward or backward through Web pages
and/or control media, games, etc.
*Note: the examples presented in this column are discussed as they are demonstrated in this chapter.
Scrolling
A scroll bar is a horizontal or vertical
bar that appears when the contents of an area
may not be visible completely on the screen
(Figure 2). A scroll bar contains scroll arrows
and a scroll box that enable you to view areas
that currently cannot be seen. Clicking the up
and down scroll arrows moves the screen content
up or down one line. You also can click above
or below the scroll box to move up or down a
section, or drag the scroll box up or down to
move up or down to move to a specii c location.
Minimize Wrist Injury
Computer users frequently
switch between the
keyboard and the mouse
during a word processing
session; such switching
strains the wrist. To help
prevent wrist injury,
minimize switching. For
instance, if your i ngers
already are on the
keyboard, use keyboard
keys to scroll. If your hand
already is on the mouse,
use the mouse to scroll.
mouse
pointer
scroll
arrows
scroll box
scroll bar
Shortcut Keys
In many cases, you can use the keyboard
instead of the mouse to accomplish a task. To
perform tasks using the keyboard, you press one
or more keyboard keys, sometimes identii ed as
Figure 2
 
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