Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Inserting Photos
PNG
“ping”
Yes
Yes
Stands for Portable Network
Graphic. An improvement on
GIF. Up to 48-bit color depth.
Lossless compression, but
smaller i le sizes than TIF. Public
domain format.
11
BMP
“B-M-P” or
“bump” or
“bitmap”
No
No
Default image type for
Windows XP. Up to 24-bit color.
Used for some Windows wallpa-
per and other Windows
graphics.
PCX
“P-C-X”
Yes
No
There are three versions: 0, 2,
and 5. Use version 5 for 24-bit
support. Originally introduced
by a company called ZSoft;
sometimes called ZSoft
Paintbrush format.
TIF or TIFF
“tiff”
Optional
Yes
Stands for Tagged Image File
Format. Supported by most
scanners and some digital cam-
eras. Up to 48-bit color. Uses
lossless compression. Large i le
size but high quality.
If you are not sure what format you will eventually use for an image, scan it in TIF format and keep the TIF copy on
your hard disk. You can always save a copy in JPEG or other formats when you need them for specii c projects. The TIF
format’s compression is lossless, so it results in a high-quality image.
Inserting Photos
Now that you know all about the factors that go into creating and selecting raster images,
it’s time to get down to the business of inserting the images on your PowerPoint slides. In
the following sections you will learn to do just that. You’ll fi nd out how to acquire photos
via a Bing search for situations in which you don’t already have what you need and how to
insert images from your own computer that you have already acquired.
Searching for Photos with Bing
Bing is Microsoft’s search engine on the Web, and PowerPoint has a built-in interface for
using Bing’s image search capabilities to fi nd photos you can use in your presentations. It’s
 
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