Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Chapter 7: Using Basic Math Functions
1. Enter some numbers in a worksheet.
These numbers can be both integer and real (decimal) values. You can
add labels to adjacent cells to identify the values, if you want.
2. Position the cursor in the cell where you want the results to appear.
3. Enter =SUM ( to begin the function entry.
4. Click a cell where you entered a number.
5. Enter a comma ( ,).
6. Click a cell where you entered another number.
7. Repeat Steps 5 and 6 until all the numbers have been entered into the
function.
8. Type a ), and press the Enter key.
Figure 7-1 shows an example of how these steps help sum up amounts that
are not situated next to each other on a worksheet. Cell F6 contains the sum
of values found in cells C2, E2, G2, and I2.
Figure 7-1:
Using
the SUM
function to
add
noncontiguous
numbers.
Using SUM is even easier when the numbers you’re adding are next to each
other in a column or row. The SUM function lets you enter a range of cells in
place of single cells in the arguments of the function. So adding a list of
contiguous numbers is as easy as giving SUM a single argument. Here’s how you
enter a range as a single argument:
1. Enter some numbers in a worksheet.
Be sure the numbers are continuous in a row or column. You can add
labels to adjacent cells to identify the values, if desired, but this doesn’t
affect the SUM function.
2. Position the cursor in the cell where you want the results to appear.
3. Enter =SUM( to begin the function entry.
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