Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Rounding Out Your Knowledge
10.4 rounds down to 10.
10.6 rounds up to 11.
10.5 also rounds up to 11.
Table 7-1 shows some examples of the ROUND function.
Table 7-1
Using the ROUND Function
Example of Function
Result
Comment
12.3
The second argument is 1. The result is
rounded to a single decimal place.
=ROUND
(12.3456,1)
12.35
The second argument is 2. The result is
rounded to two decimal places. Note that
the full decimal of .3456 becomes .35. This
is because the .0456 portion of the decimal
value rounds to the closest second place
decimal, which is .05.
=ROUND
(12.3456,2)
12.346
The second argument is 3. The result is
rounded to three decimal places. Note that
the full decimal or .3456 becomes .346. This
is because the .0056 portion of the decimal
value rounds to the closest third place
decimal, which is .006.
=ROUND
(12.3456,3)
=ROUND
(12.3456,4)
12.3456
The second argument is 4. There are four
decimal places. No rounding takes place.
12
When the second argument is 0, the number
is rounded to the nearest integer. Because
12.3456 is closer to 12 than to 13, the number
rounds to 12.
=ROUND
(12.3456,0)
=ROUND
(12.3456,-1)
10
When negative values are used in the
second argument, the rounding occurs on
the left side of the decimal (the integer
portion). A second argument value of –1 tells the
function to round to the closest value of 10.
In this example, that value is 10 because 12
is closer to 10 than 20.
Here’s how to use the ROUND function:
1. In a cell of your choice, enter a number that has a decimal portion.
2. Position the cursor in the cell where you want the results to appear.
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