Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Looking It Up
3. Enter a reference to the table.
You can drag the mouse over the range or enter its address. If the table
has been named, you can enter the name.
4. Enter a comma ( ,).
5. Enter the row number relative to the table’s first row.
This number can be the result of a calculation or the value returned
from a function.
6. Enter a comma ( ,).
7. Enter the column number relative to the table’s leftmost column.
This number can be the result of a calculation or the value returned
from a function.
8. Type a ), and press Enter.
FORMULATEXT
FORMULATEXT displays the syntax of a formula. It’s simple and yet serves
a great feature. Think about it. You might have a workbook full of formulas;
however, all you see is the result of the calculations. What if you need to see
the formulas themselves? It’s great to have the answer given by a calculation,
but often you need to know how the calculation works!
FORMULATEXT to the rescue! This function references a cell that has a
formula and displays the formula without having it calculate the answer. Figure
14-14 shows how this works. Columns A and B contain numbers. Column
C contains formulas that return calculated values using the numbers in
Columns A and B. Column D uses FORMULATEXT to display the formulas
in Column C.
Here’s how to use the FORMULATEXT function:
1. Click a cell where you want the result to appear.
2. Enter =FORMULATEXT( to start the function.
3. Click on a cell that has a formula.
4. Type a ), and press Enter.
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