Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Finding What IS and What IS Not
The errors Excel reports are not very friendly. What on earth does #N/A
really tell you? The functions I describe in this section won’t make the error
any clearer, but they give you a way to instead display a friendly message like
“Something is wrong, but I don’t know what it is.”
Table 15-4 shows the IS functions and how they’re used. They all return
either True or False, so the table just lists them.
Table 15-4
Using the IS Functions to See What Really Is
Function
Comment
=ISBLANK(value)
Tells whether a cell is blank.
=ISERR(value)
Tells whether a cell contains any error other
than #N/A .
=ISERROR(value)
Tells whether a cell contains any error.
ISEVEN(value)
Tells whether a number is even.
=ISLOGICAL(value)
Tells whether value is logical.
=ISNA(value)
Tells whether a cell contains the #N/A error.
Tells whether a cell contains a number or error.
=ISNONTEXT(value)
Tells whether a cell contains a number.
=ISNUMBER(value)
Tells whether a number is odd.
ISODD(value)
=ISREF(value)
Tells whether value is a reference.
=ISTEXT(value)
Tells whether a cell contains text.
ISERR, ISERROR, and ISNA
Three of the IS functions — ISERR, ISERROR, and ISNA — tell you about
an error.
Error Function
Comments
ISERR
Returns true if the error is anything except the #N/A
error. For example, the #DIV/0! error returns true.
ISNA
The opposite of ISERR. It only returns true if the
error is #N/A.
ISERROR
Returns true for any type of error. This includes
#N/A, #VALUE!, #REF!, DIV/0!, #NUM!, #NAME?,
and #NULL!.
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