Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Comparing, Finding, and Measuring Text
FIND
FIND takes three arguments:
The string to find
The larger string to search in
The position in the larger string to start looking at; this argument is
optional
If the third argument is left out, the function starts looking at the beginning of
the larger string. Here are some examples:
Value in Cell A1
Function
Result
Happy birthday to you
=FIND(“Birthday”,A1)
#VALUE!
Happy birthday to you
=FIND(“birthday”,A1)
7
Happy birthday to you
=FIND(“y”,A1)
5
Happy birthday to you
=FIND(“y”,A1,10)
14
In the first example using FIND, an error is returned. The #VALUE! error is
returned if the text cannot be found. Birthday is not the same as birthday,
at least to the case-sensitive FIND function.
SEARCH
The SEARCH function takes the same arguments as FIND. The two common
wildcards you can use are the asterisk (*) and the question mark (?). An
asterisk tells the function to accept any number of characters (including zero
characters). A question mark tells the function to accept any single
character. It is not uncommon to see more than one question mark together as a
wildcard pattern. Table 16-3 shows several examples.
Table 16-3
Using the SEARCH Function
Value in
Cell A1
Function
Result
Comment
Happy
birthday
to you
=SEARCH
(“Birthday”,A1)
7
Birthday starts in
position 7.
Happy
birthday
to you
=SEARCH(“y??”,A1)
5
The first place where
a y is followed by any
two characters is at
position 5. This is the
last letter in Happy,
a space, and the first
letter in birthday.
 
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