Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Compiling a Bibliography
By the way, the Convert button in the Footnote and Endnote dialog box is for
fickle scholars who suddenly decide that their endnotes should be footnotes
or vice versa. Click it and choose an option in the Convert Notes dialog box
to turn footnotes into endnotes, turn endnotes into footnotes, or — in
documents with both endnotes and footnotes — make the endnotes footnotes
and the footnotes endnotes.
Deleting, moving, and editing notes
If a devious editor tells you that a footnote or endnote is in the wrong place,
that you don’t need a note, or that you need to change the text in a note, all
is not lost:
Editing: To edit a note, double-click its number or symbol in the text.
You see the note on-screen. Edit the note at this point.
Moving: To move a note, select its number or symbol in the text and
drag it to a new location, or cut and paste it to a new location.
Deleting: To delete a note, select its number or symbol and press the
Delete key.
Footnotes and endnotes are renumbered when you move or delete one of
them.
Compiling a Bibliography
A bibliography is a list, usually in alphabetical order by author name, of all
the books, journal articles, websites, interviews, and other sources used in
the writing of an article, report, or book. Writing a good bibliography is a
chore. Besides keeping careful track of sources, you have to list them
correctly. Does the author’s name or work’s name come first in the citation?
How do you list a website or magazine article without an author’s name?
Word’s Bibliography feature is very nice in this regard: It solves the problem
of how to enter citations for a bibliography. All you have to do is enter the
bare facts about the citation — the author’s name, title, publication date,
publisher, and so on — and Word presents this information correctly in the
bibliography. You can choose among several popular bibliographical styles
(APA, Chicago, and others) from the Style drop-down list, as shown in Figure
8-9. After you make your choice, Word reformats all bibliography citations.
You don’t have to worry about whether titles should be underlined or
italicized, or how authors’ names should be listed in the bibliography.
 
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