Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Moving from Slide to Slide
Moving from Slide to Slide
The most common way to move in a PowerPoint presentation is to press the
Page Down and Page Up keys:
Page Down: Press Page Down to move forward to the next slide in your
presentation.
Page Up: Press Page Up to move backward to the preceding slide in
your presentation.
You can also use the vertical scroll bar on the right side of the window to
navigate through your presentation:
Double-headed arrows: You can move forward or backward through
your presentation one slide at a time by clicking the double-headed
arrows at the bottom of the vertical scroll bar.
Single-headed arrows: You can also scroll forward or backward through
your presentation by clicking and holding the single-headed arrow at the
top or bottom of the vertical scroll bar. (Note that if the zoom factor is
set so that a single slide is visible in the presentation window, clicking
the single-headed arrows moves to the next or preceding slide.)
Scroll box: Another way to move quickly from slide to slide is by
dragging the scroll bar up or down. When you drag the scroll bar, a little
tooltip pops up next to it to tell you which slide will be displayed if you
stop dragging at that point.
Working with Objects
In the beginning, the User created a slide. And the slide was formless and
void, without meaning or content. And the User said, “Let there be a Text
Object.” And there was a Text Object. And there was evening and there was
morning, one day. Then the User said, “Let there be a Picture Object.” And
there was a Picture Object. And there was evening and there was morning,
a second day. This continued for forty days and forty nights, until there were
forty objects on the slide, each after its own kind. And the User was laughed
out of the auditorium by the audience who could not read the slide.
I present this charming little parable solely to make the point that
PowerPoint slides are nothing without objects. Objects are items — such
as text, pictures, and charts — that give meaning and content to otherwise
formless and empty slides. When it comes to objects, however, sometimes
less is more. Don’t overdo it by cluttering your slides with so many objects
that the main point of the slide is obscured.
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