Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
CREATING GRAPHICS
You should use pie charts to display data that is related to a whole. For example, you might use a pie
chart when breaking down manufacturing costs into Direct Materials, Direct Labor, and Manufacturing
Overhead, as shown in Figure F-3. (Note that when you create a pie chart, Excel will convert the numbers you
want to graph into percentages of 100.)
LCD TV Manufacturing Cost
Mfg Overhead
36%
Direct Materials
53%
Direct Labor
11 %
FIGURE F-3
Pie chart: appropriate use
s sales over a three-year period. For
example, the pie chart in Figure F-4 is meaningless because it is not useful to think of the period
You would not, however, use a pie chart to display a company
as a whole
or
the years as its
parts.
Company Sales–2008 to 2010
2008
33%
2010
34%
2009
33%
FIGURE F-4
Pie chart: inappropriate use
You should use vertical bar charts (also called column charts) to compare several amounts at the same
time, or to compare the same data collected for successive periods of time. The same type of company sales
data shown in Figure F-4 can be compared correctly using a vertical bar chart (see Figure F-5).
 
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