Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Using the F4 Key to Simplify Dollar Sign Entry
There are two kinds of mixed references. One mixed reference freezes the row
number and allows the column letter to change, as in A$1. The other mixed ref-
erence freezes the column letter but allows the row number to change, as in
$A1. No one has thought up clever names to distinguish between these refer-
ences, so they are simply called mixed references.
To illustrate the other kind of mixed reference, as shown in Figure 8.9 , say
you want a single formula to multiply the daily rate from column A by the
number of days in row 4. This formula requires both kinds of mixed referen-
ces.
Figure 8.9.
Figure 8.9. You can create a formula by using a combination of dollar signs
You can create a formula by using a combination of dollar signs
to allow cell C6 to be copied to all cells in the table.
to allow cell C6 to be copied to all cells in the table.
In this case, you want the cell A6 reference to always point to column A,
even when the formula is copied to the right. Therefore, the A6 portion of the
formula should be entered as $A6. You also want the C5 portion of the for-
mula to always point to row 5, even when the formula is copied down the rows.
Therefore, the C5 portion of the formula should be entered as C$5.
Using the F4 Key to Simplify Dollar Sign Entry
Using the F4 Key to Simplify Dollar Sign Entry
In the preceding section, you entered quite a few dollar signs in formulas. The
good news is that you do not have to type the dollar signs! Instead, immedi-
ately after entering a reference, press the F4 key to toggle the reference from
a relative reference to an absolute reference, which automatically has the
dollar signs before the row and column. If you press F4 again, the referen-
ce toggles to a mixed reference with a dollar sign before the row number. When
you press F4 once again, the reference toggles to a mixed reference with a dol-
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