Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
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Stacking Multiple Parentheses
Figure 9.3.
Figure 9.3. Excel evaluates the operation in parentheses first.
Excel evaluates the operation in parentheses first.
Stacking Multiple Parentheses
If you need to use multiple sets of parentheses when doing math by hand, you
might write math formulas with square brackets and curly braces, like this:
{3-[6*4*3-(3-6)+2]/27}*14
In Excel, you use multiple sets of parentheses, as follows:
=(3-(6*4*3-(3-6)+2)/27)*14
Formulas with multiple parentheses in Excel are confusing. Excel does two
things to try to improve this situation:
As you type a formula, Excel colors the parentheses in a set order:
black, red, purple, green, violet, topaz, aquamarine, blue. The colors
then repeat starting with red. This is a subtle but important change in
Excel 2013. By far, the most common problem is having one too few or
one too many parentheses. By using red as the second color, the last
parenthesis in most unbalanced equations is red. Excel only uses
black for the first parenthesis and for the closing match to that
parenthesis. This means if your last parenthesis in the formula is
not black, you have the wrong number of parentheses.
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