Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Working with Functions
The last two new functions are simply renamed functions:
FLOOR.MATH and CEILING.MATH replace FLOOR.PRECISE and
CEILING.PRECISE.
No matter what you are trying to do in Excel, there are functions for you.
If you cannot find a built-in function, there s a good chance a third-party
vendor sells an add-in program to Excel that adds new customized functions
to assist in your particular industry. If not, you can pick up a book on pro-
gramming VBA to learn how to write your own custom functions in Excel.
Referto Chapter14 ofVBA and Macros for Microsoft Excel 2013,
byJelenandSyrstad(Que,ISBN0789748614),tolearnabout30
cool functions you can add to Excel.
Working with Functions
To use functions successfully in a worksheet, you need to follow the func-
tion syntax. Keep in mind that a formula that makes use of a function needs to
start with an equal sign. You type the function name, an opening parenthesis,
function arguments (separated by commas), and the closing parenthesis.
The general syntax of a function looks like this:
=FunctionName(Argument1,Argument2,Argument3)
In general, there should be no spaces anywhere in a function. Specifically,
you should never use a space between the function name and the opening par-
enthesis. Some people like to add a space after each comma in a function, like
this:
=FunctionName(Argument1, Argument2, Argument3)
Although this is not required, it does increase the readability of the final
function. For what it s worth, Excel correctly calculates a formula with
or without these spaces, so it s a personal choice as to whether you in-
clude them.
Parentheses are needed with every function, including functions that require
no arguments. For example, these functions still require the parentheses:
=NOW()
=DATE()
=TODAY()
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