Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Syntax
The COUNT function counts the number of cells that contain numbers and
also numbers within the list of arguments. You use COUNT to get the number
of numeric entries in a range or array.
The arguments value1, value2,...are one to 255 arguments that can contain or
refer to a variety of types of data, but only numbers are counted.
Note that whereas a single error cell in a range causes the SUM function to
return an error, the same condition is ignored in the COUNT function.
=COUNT(1,2,"3") results in the text entry being counted. If you refer to a
range that contains text that looks like a number, the text is not included in
the count. To include text cells in the count, use COUNTA.
Syntax
=COUNTA(value1,value2,...)
COUNTA counts the number of cells that are not empty and the values within
the list of arguments. You use COUNTA to count the number of cells that
contain data in a range or an array.
The arguments value1, value2,...are one to 255 arguments representing the
values you want to count. In this case, a value is any type of information,
including empty text ("") but not including empty cells. If an argument is an
array or a reference, empty cells within the array or reference are ignored.
If you do not need to count logical values, text, or error values, you should
use the COUNT function.
Caution
Using more than 30 arguments in COUNT or COUNTA causes backward
compatibility problems with Excel 2003 and earlier.
Note that error cells are included in the results from COUNTA.
Choosing Between
Choosing Between COUNT
COUNT and
and COUNTA
COUNTA
The key to choosing between COUNT and COUNTA is to analyze the data you
want to count. In Figure 11.6 , someone has used the letter Xin column B to in-
dicate that training has been started. In this case, you would use COUNTA
to get an accurate count. Column C contains dates (which are treated as nu-
meric). In column C, either COUNT or COUNTA returns the correct result.
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