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Using GCD and LCM to Perform Seventh-Grade Math
Using
Using GCD
GCD and
and LCM
LCM to Perform Seventh-Grade Math
to Perform Seventh-Grade Math
My seventh-grade math teacher, Mr. Irwin, taught me about greatest common
denominators and least common multiples. For example, the least common
multiple of 24 and 36 is 72. The greatest common denominator of 24 and 36 is 12.
I have to admit that I never saw these concepts again until my son Josh was
in seventh grade. This must be permanently part of the seventh-grade cur-
riculum.
If you are in seventh grade or you are assisting a seventh grader with his or
her math lesson, you will be happy to know that Excel can calculate these
values for you.
Syntax
=GCD(number1,number2,...)
The GCD function returns the greatest common divisor of two or more integers.
The greatest common divisor is the largest integer that divides both number1
and number2without a remainder.
The arguments number1, number2,... are one to 255 values. If any value is
not an integer, it is truncated. If any argument is nonnumeric, GCD returns a
#VALUE! error. If any argument is less than zero, GCD returns a #NUM! er-
ror. The number 1 divides any value evenly. A prime number has only itself
and 1 as even divisors.
Syntax
=LCM(number1,number2,...)
The LCM function returns the least common multiple of integers. The least
common multiple is the smallest positive integer that is a multiple of all in-
teger arguments number1, number2, and so on. You use LCM to add fractions
with different denominators.
The arguments number1,number2,...are one to 29 values for which you want
the least common multiple. If the value is not an integer, it is truncated. If
any argument is nonnumeric, LCM returns a #VALUE! error. If any argument is
less than 1, LCM returns a #NUM! error.
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