Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Syntax
can process many lookups in one single array formula. LOOKUP can also
deal with a lookup range that is vertical and a return range that is hori-
zontal, or vice versa.
The next section looks at the common use of LOOKUP and how it contrasts
with VLOOKUP and HLOOKUP.
Syntax
LOOKUP(lookup_value, array)
In this case, LOOKUP is acting similar to VLOOKUP or HLOOKUP. Excel ex-
amines the height and width of the array. If the array has more rows than
columns, Excel assumes you are doing a VLOOKUP and looks through the
first column of the array for the lookup value. If the array has more
columns than rows, Excel assumes you are doing an HLOOKUP and looks
through the first row of the array for the lookup value. If the array has
the same number of rows as columns, it does a VLOOKUP.
In this syntax of LOOKUP, Excel always returns the value from the last
column or row of the array. In Figure 12.31 , the formula in C2 is returning a
value from cell G3. Because the array is described as E2:G5, Excel automat-
ically returns a value from the final column of E2:G5. Because the array
is four rows and three columns, Excel assumes you want the equivalent to
VLOOKUP instead of HLOOKUP. In cell C3, the lookup array is E8:H9. Be-
cause this array is wider than it is tall, cell C3 does the equivalent of an
HLOOKUP.
Search JabSto ::




Custom Search