Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Using Auto Shapes in Charts
You’ll often find it useful to add a
text box or other Auto Shape to
charts.
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Here, for example, I used a text box
to provide the unit of measure for
the primary Y axis. I used a callout
to comment on a point in the chart.
And I used another text box as an
alert that we were over budget.
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Bad month.
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Over Budget
▲T ho usand $
The unit-of-measure label is more useful than the callout. This is
because the callout only can be used with the current instance of
the chart. When the data changes, the callout won’t adapt. The
third label does adapt, as you’ll see.
The key to adding Auto Shapes to charts is to select the Chart Area
before you choose a shape. By doing so, you add the shape to the
chart object itself. On the other hand, if a cell is active when you
select a shape, the new shape won’t become part of the chart.
Dynamic Text Boxes
The Over Buget text box is dynamic. That is, it points to a
worksheet formula that chooses the text to display. The cell that
contains this formula also determines the text box’s format, to some
degree.
To set up a dynamic text box, first enter a short phrase into a cell.
Format its font as you want it to appear in your chart. Then add a
text box to your chart.
A quick way to add a dynamic text box to your chart is to choose
the Chart Area, enter “=” (without the quotes) in the formula bar,
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