Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
information from another worksheet. Neither the column widths nor
the row heights of the Camera objects line up with the worksheet,
nor with each other.
If you’ve struggled to create a good-looking management report—
particularly a “magazine-quality” management report—this figure
should grab your attention.
The Camera tool frees Excel reports completely from the rigidity
dictated by Excel’s row-and-column structure. We can use rows
and columns when they suit us, and ignore them when they don’t.
This report was easy to create. In Sheet1, I selected the range of
products, clicked on the Camera icon, clicked on the tab of an
empty worksheet, Sheet3, then clicked on cell A1 of that worksheet
to paste the Camera object.
Next I selected the customer information in Sheet2, clicked on the
Camera icon, clicked on Sheet3’s tab, then clicked on some other
cell in that worksheet.
Finally, I aligned the objects as shown.
Rotate Your Reports
This figure shows a picture of the previous
figure, which consisted of two pictures. It’s a
picture of some pictures.
A
B
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
However, this figure shows a picture rotated by
270 degrees. The figure illustrates a solution to
one common problem, and suggests an
interesting direction for future management
reports.
Here’s the common problem: Most managers
prefer to receive management reports printed using the portrait
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