Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Copy the range C23:E24 to the range C25:E28.
Two Camera objects are used in this figure.
Each relies on a defined name.
AB C
D
E
F
Top Regions
# i n
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
e
1 New York
193
2 California
179
The name Shutter2 is defined as:
=IF($C$25>DataRows, $B$31:$E$32,
$A$25)
3 Kansas
165
4 Alabama
161
5 Montana
157
5
#N/A
#N/A
5
#N/A
#N/A
5
#N/A
#N/A
And the name Shutter3 is defined as:
=IF($C$27>DataRows, $B$31:$E$32,
$A$27)
5
#N/A
#N/A
5
#N/A
#N/A
DataRows
5
Slots
3
To set up the shutter for slot 3, select any
cell, click on the Camera icon, then click on
any cell.
PageCount
1
Pages
2
Top Regions
#
Region
Right-click on the Camera object and
choose Format Picture. In the Colors and
Lines tab, specify No Fill and No Line.
Then change the Camera object’s formula
in the tool bar to =Shutter3.
1
1 New York
Score:
193
2
2 California
Score:
2
179
3
3
3 Kansas
Score:
165
Position the object in cell B27. (The 3 that
appears in cell B27 is returned by the Camera object.)
Similarly, set up the shutter for slot 2, and move the Camera object
to cell B25.
To see how the Camera object works with Shutter3, suppose the
page count is 1. In this case, cell C27 contains the value 3, which is
less than 5. Therefore, the Camera returns a picture of cell A27.
But when the page count is 2, cell C27 contains 6, which is greater
than 5. Therefore, the Camera returns a picture of the range
B31:E32, a picture that hides the contents of the range C27:E28.
Shutter 2 works similarly.
 
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