Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
While you are looking at authentication, select Windows Authentication in the content pane, and
then click Providers in the action pane. It will show you that, for Windows authentication, IIS can
support either NTLM or negotiating Kerberos.
You might be tempted, now that you know this is here, to make changes to the settings that
affect SharePoint in IIS. Don’t. SharePoint doesn’t like it, or more specifically, the configuration
database that is shared by the farm and is used by SharePoint to keep track of all its settings
won’t know you made the change unless you do it through SharePoint’s GUI or command-line
tools. However, if you made changes to authentication on SharePoint-80 in SharePoint, it would
change the settings here.
C H E C K I N G W E B S E R V I C E S
The third IIS Web Site is a new feature of this version of SharePoint, Web Services. It was
decided that some of the features used in the paid version of SharePoint (SharePoint Server 2010)
should be moved to be more a part of the infrastructure of SharePoint and less a complete (and
complicated) add-on. That way, it would be built into SharePoint Foundation, too.
Thus, SharePoint Foundation, the version we’re working with here, gets a Web Services IIS Web
Site, along with the chance to actually use Business Data Connectivity (BDC) and have a number of
features listed in Central Administration that we cannot really use—unless we upgrade to the paid
version (then they’ll work great, because the underpinnings have been there all along).
The Web Services IIS Web Site does not have any web pages to browse to, per se, and listens
on only custom ports, set up by the configuration wizard, to accomplish particular, obscure,
primarily Windows Communication Framework tasks. The web services applications that are
supported by this IIS Web Site are BDC, topology, and security token management (Figure 2.47).
The BDC application is the one with the long, inexplicable GUID as its name.
C H E C K I N G T H E A P P L I C A T I O N P O O L S
As a final quick check, we need to see what application pools have been created, who is using
them, and what identities they are using. The applications each have to run with their own
application pool and therefore an application pool identity. Unfortunately, because they are set
up by the configuration wizard, they tend to have long, obscure, GUID-like names. To see what
I’m talking about, click the Application Pools icon in the connections pane (Figure 2.48).
 
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