Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Selecting a Data Source
Figure 4-2
Excel chart types
Chart Type
Description
Column
Compares values from different categories. Values are indicated by the height of
the columns.
Line
Compares values from different categories. Values are indicated by the height of
the line. Often used to show trends and changes over time.
Pie
Compares relative values of different categories to the whole. Values are indicated
by the areas of the pie slices.
Bar
Compares values from different categories. Values are indicated by the length of
the bars.
Area
Compares values from different categories. Similar to the line chart except that
areas under the lines contain a fill color.
Scatter
Shows the patterns or relationship between two or more sets of values. Often used
in scientific studies and statistical analyses.
Stock
Displays stock market data, including the high, low, opening, and closing prices of
a stock.
Surface
Compares three sets of values in a three-dimensional chart.
Doughnut
Compares relative values of different categories to the whole. Similar to the pie
chart except that it can display multiple sets of data.
Bubble
Shows the patterns or relationship between two or more sets of values. Similar to the
XY (Scatter) chart except the size of the data marker is determined by a third value.
Radar
Compares a collection of values from several different data sets.
You should select the type of chart that best represents the data. For example, a pie
chart provides the best way to show the breakout of the asset data you selected. A pie
chart is a chart in the shape of a circle (like a pie) that shows data values as a
percentage of the whole. Each value in the data series represents a slice of the pie. The larger the
value, the larger the pie slice. For the asset data, each slice will represent the percentage
of the total assets from each investment category in the New Century Fund.
Pie charts are most effective with six or fewer slices, and when each slice is large
enough to view. The pie chart of the asset data will have fi ve large slices, representing the
fi ve asset categories—Cash, U.S. Stocks, Non-U.S. Stocks, Bonds, and Other. The Total
Assets row, which you did not select as part of the data source, is not an asset category
and should not be included in a pie chart.
The data source for a pie
chart should include only
the category labels and
data values and not row
or column totals because
Excel will treat those totals
as another category to be
graphed.
To insert a pie chart:
1. Click the Insert tab on the Ribbon. The Ribbon displays the insert options.
2. In the Charts group, click the Pie button. The Pie Charts gallery opens.
3. In the 2-D Pie section, click Pie (the first pie chart in the first row). The pie chart
is inserted in the Assets sheet, and three new tabs appear on the Ribbon with a
label identifying them as Chart Tools contextual tabs. See Figure 4-3.
 
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