Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Accepting a Task
Adding a Task
(Alt, H, E). The dialog box that opens is similar to the Appointment Recurrence box
(Figure 13-6), and it works the same way. Set the task’s recurrence pattern and range
(page 332 explains about those) and then click OK. Outlook keeps adding the task
to your list for as long as you’ve specified.
Assigning a task
When you create a task, the real fun lies in passing it to somebody else. Of course,
the person you assign a task to can always refuse it, but this feature is helpful for
project managers, Big Cheeses, and others who delegate work.
To assign a task, start by pressing Ctrl+N or selecting Home New Task (Alt, H,
N1). When the Task window opens, click the Task tab’s Assign Task button (Alt, H,
B). The Task window changes, morphing the task you’re creating into an email
message. Fill in the email address of the person you’re assigning the task to and take a
look at these checkboxes (both are on by default):
Keep an updated copy of this task on my task list. This option lets you track a
task’s progress as the person you assigned it to updates the task—just check your
own Tasks list and To-Do List to see how it’s going. If you don’t want to keep tabs
on the task, turn off this checkbox.
Send me a status report when this task is complete. When the person doing
the task crosses it off her list by marking it as completed, you get an email
letting you know it’s done. If you’d prefer not to get the status report, turn off the
checkbox.
When you’ve created the task, click Send to email it to the person you assigned it
to. If you told Outlook to keep a copy of the task on your Task list, it appears there
as well. Tasks you’ve assigned to someone else have a special icon: a clipboard and a
blue arrow pointing to a person (like the picture on the Assign Task button).
Note: Assigning a task transfers ownership of that task to the other person, so that person can overwrite
any changes you make to the task.
Accepting a Task
The second way to put a task on your To-Do List is to accept a task that somebody
else assigns to you. When someone does this, you get an email from that person with
Task Request and the task’s name in the Subject line. Inside the email are buttons
labeled Accept and Decline, circled in Figure 13-10. Click Accept to add it to your
To-Do List or Decline if you aren’t willing and able.
Outlook sends an email to the person who assigned you the task, notifying him of
your response.
 
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