Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Scaling
Controlling
Pagination
Figure 14-44:
Using a page break,
you can make sure
the second table
(2010 Purchases)
always begins on a
new page. The dotted
line shows where
one page ends and
the new page starts.
When you add a
page break, you see
a dotted line for it,
and you see a dotted
line that shows you
where additional
page breaks naturally
fall, based on your
margins, page
orientation, and paper size
settings.
Manually added
page break
Natural page
break
Scaling
Page breaks are a nifty feature for making sure you paginate your printouts just the
way you want them. However, they can’t help you fit more information on a page.
They simply let you place page breaks earlier than they would ordinarily appear, so
they fall in a more appropriate place.
If you want to fit more on a page, you need to shrink your information down to a
smaller size. Excel includes a scaling feature that lets you take this step easily without
forcing you to reformat your worksheet.
Scaling lets you fit more rows and columns on a page, by shrinking everything
proportionally. For example, if you reduce scaling to 50 percent, you fit twice as many
columns and rows on a page. Conversely, you can use scaling to enlarge your data.
To change the scaling percentage, just type a new percentage into the Page
Layout Scale to Fit Scale box. The data still appears just as big on your worksheet,
but Excel shrinks or expands it in the printout. To gauge the effect, you can use the
Page Layout view (page 403) to preview your printout.
Rather than fiddling with the scaling percentage (and then seeing what its effect is
on your worksheet by trial and error), you may want to force your data to fit into a
fixed number of pages. To do this, you set the values in the Page Layout Scale to
Fit Width box and the Page Layout Scale to Fit Height box. Excel performs a
few behind-the-scenes calculations and adjusts the scaling percentage accordingly.
For example, if you choose one page tall and one page wide, then Excel shrinks your
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