Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Worksheets and Workbooks
Worksheets and
Workbooks
Figure 15-13:
Stacking tables on top of each other is usually a bad idea. If you
need to add more data to the first table, then you must move
the second table. You’ll also have trouble properly resizing or
formatting columns because each column contains data from two
different tables.
Figure 15-14:
You’re somewhat better off
putting tables side by side,
separated by a blank
column, than you are stacking
them, but this method can
create problems if you need
to add more columns to the
first table. It also makes for a
lot of side-to-side scrolling.
To move from one worksheet to another, you have a few choices:
• Click the worksheet tabs at the bottom of Excel’s grid window (just above the
status bar), as shown in Figure 15-15.
• Press Ctrl+Page Down to move to the next worksheet. For example, if you’re
currently in Sheet1, this key sequence jumps you to Sheet2.
• Press Ctrl+Page Up to move to the previous worksheet. For example, if you’re
currently in Sheet2, this key sequence takes you back to Sheet1.
Figure 15-15:
Worksheets provide a good
way to organize multiple
tables of data. To move from
one worksheet to another,
click the appropriate
Worksheet tab at the bottom of the
grid. Each worksheet contains
a fresh grid of cells—from A1
all the way to XFD1048576.
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