Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Editing a Table
Getting Started with
Your First Database
Moves the cursor one field to the left (in Normal mode), or up when
you reach the edge of the table. In Edit mode, this key moves the cursor
through the text in the current field.
Moves the cursor up one row (unless you’re already at the top of the
table). This key also turns off Edit mode.
Moves the cursor down one row (or it moves you to the “new row”
position if you’re at the bottom of the table). This key also turns off Edit mode.
Home
Moves the cursor to the first field in the current row. This key brings you to
beginning of the current field if you’re in Edit mode.
End
Moves the cursor to the last field in the current row. This key brings you to
the end of the current field if you’re in Edit mode.
Page Down
Moves the cursor down one screenful (assuming you have a large table of
information that doesn’t all fit in the Access window at once). This key also
turns off Edit mode.
Page Up
Moves the cursor up one screenful. This key also turns off Edit mode.
Ctrl+Home
Moves the cursor to the first field in the first row. This key doesn’t do
anything if you’re in Edit mode.
Ctrl+End
Moves the cursor to the last field in the last row. This key doesn’t do
anything if you’re in Edit mode.
Table 25-2 lists some convenient keys for editing records.
Table 25-3. Keys for editing records
Key
Result
Esc
Cancels any changes you’ve made in the current field. This key works only
if you use it in Edit mode. Once you move to the next cell, the change
is applied. (For additional cancellation control, try the Undo feature,
described next.)
Ctrl+Z
Reverses the last edit. Unfortunately, the Undo feature in Access isn’t nearly
as powerful as it is in other Office programs. For example, Access allows
you to reverse only one change, and if you close the datasheet, you can’t
even do that. You can use Undo right after you insert a new record to
remove it, but you can’t use the Undo feature to reverse a delete operation.
Ctrl+”
Copies a value from the field that’s immediately above the current field.
This trick is handy when you need to enter a batch of records with similar
information. Figure 25-10 shows this often-overlooked trick in action.
Ctrl+;
Inserts today’s date into the current field. The date format is based on
computer settings, but expect to see something like “24-12-2010”. You’ll
learn more about how Access works with dates on page 727.
Ctrl+Alt+Space
Inserts the default value for the field. You’ll learn how to designate a
default value on page 731.
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