Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Making changes to what you’ve written
If you need to go back and change something you wrote earlier, you fi rst need to
position your cursor in the place where you want to make changes. The simplest
way to do this (particularly if you spot the error quickly) is to use the cursor keys
to move through your document. The cursor keys have arrows on them pointing
up, down, left and right and are usually grouped together somewhere on the right
of the keyboard (see Figure 0.1 in Introduction).
When you press the left cursor key, the cursor will move back through your text,
one character at a time. If you press the up cursor key, the cursor will go up a line.
The right and down cursor keys will take you back in those directions. The cursor
can’t go outside of the text, so you can’t position the cursor beyond the end of
what you’ve typed. If you go up or down into a shorter line, the cursor will jump
to where the text fi nishes on that line.
If you have a long document it can take almost as long to shuffl e through the text
as it did to type it, so there are a number of keys you can use to move around the
document more quickly, as shown in Table 1.1. (Refer to Figure 0.1 for an
indication of where you can fi nd these keys.)
Table 1.1 Keyboard shortcuts for navigating your Word document
Key(s)
Effect on cursor
Home
Moves to the start of the current line
End
Moves to the end of the current line
Page Up
Moves up a page through the document (you’ll need
to have a document that’s more than one page long
to see this in action)
Page Down
Moves down a page through the document
CTRL+left
Moves one word to the left
CTRL+right
Moves one word to the right
CTRL+up
Moves to the start of the next paragraph up
CTRL+down
Moves to the start of the next paragraph down
CTRL+end
Moves to the end of the document
CTRL+home
Moves to the start of the document
 
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