Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Understanding External Data
Understanding
External Data
External data is data that resides outside of
Excel in a file, database, server, or Web site.
You can import external data directly into an
Excel PivotTable or worksheet for additional
types of data analysis.
Before you learn the specifics of importing
external data into your Excel workbooks, you
need to understand the various types of
external data that you are likely to encounter.
For the vast majority of applications, external
data comes in one of the following six formats:
data sources, Access tables, Word tables, text
files, Web pages, and XML files.
You also need to understand how you access
external data. This means understanding where
external data resides — such as in a file located
on your computer, in a file located on your
network, on a network server, on a Web page,
or on a Web server — and how you access that
data, for example, with a username and
password.
Data Source File
In Chapter 8, you learn about Open Database
Connectivity (ODBC) data sources, which give
you access to data residing in databases such
as Access and dBase, or on servers such as
SQL Server and Oracle. However, there are
many other data-source types that connect to
specific objects in a data source. For more
information, see the section, “Import Data
from a Data Source.”
Access Table
Microsoft Access is the Office suite’s relational
database management system, and so it is
often used to store and manage the bulk of
the data used by a person, team, department,
or company. For more information, see the
section, “Import Data from an Access Table.”
Database Storage
Database Storage
Database Storage
Database Storage
Word Table
Some simple data is often stored in a table
embedded in a Word document. You can
only perform so much analysis on that data
within Word, and so it is often useful to
import the data from the Word table into an
Excel worksheet. For more information, see
the section, “Import Data from a Word Table.”
Text File
Text files often contain useful data. If that
data is formatted properly — for example,
where each line has the same number of
items, all separated by spaces, commas, or
tabs — then it is possible to import that data
into Excel for further analysis. For more
information, see the section, “Import Data
from a Text File.”
3
Li
Lithium
6.941
2
1
4
Be
Beryllium
9.012182
1 2
Be
Be ryllium
9.012 182
2
11
N a
Sodium
22.9 89770
2
1
2
2 0
Ca
C alcium
40.0 78
8
2
19
Pot assium
39.0983
2
8
1
18
2
38
Sr
Stron tium
87.62
2
18
1
37
R b
Rubid ium
85 .4678
2
8
18
18
8
2
56
B a
Barium
137.32 7
2
18
1
1
55
C s
Ces sium
1 32.9 054 5
2
8
18
32
18
8
2
8 8
R a
Ra dium
(22 6)
8
3 2
1 8
1
8 7
F r
F ranc ium
(22 3)
 
Search JabSto ::




Custom Search