Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Entering Excel Data
Chapter 8
Creating a Basic Worksheet
If your value is too large to fit into the cell width,
Excel may display a series of number signs (####),
or it may round the value display. Don’t worry
about the appearance that displays in Excel. You’ll
discover how to change the display of your data in
Chapter 10. Table 8-2 illustrates some of the ways
that Excel, by default, displays numeric data.
When you enter a date, by default Excel may not
display it on the screen in the same way that you
type it. You will discover how to format dates in
different arrangements in Chapter 10, “Making
Your Worksheet Look Good.” Table 8-3 and Figure
8-7 show how Excel automatically displays dates.
Table 8-2 Excel Value Appearances
Keystroke
Result
1074
1074
0174
174
'0174
0174
39.95
39.95
Figure 8-7
Entering dates into the worksheet.
39.50
39.5
39.501
39.501
Table 8-3 Entering Dates
4789547.365
4789547.37
You Type
Excel Displays
January 23, 2010
23-Jan-10
Entering Dates
Although dates contain characters, and look like a
label, Excel technically considers them values,
because Excel can calculate the time between
dates, which you will learn about in Chapter 9,
“Working with Formulas and Functions.” For
example, day 1 is January 1st, 1900, day 2 is January
2nd, 1900, and so forth.
January 23
23-Jan
Jan 23
23-Jan
1/23
23-Jan
1-23
23-Jan
1-23-10
1/23/2010
1/23/10
1/23/2010
Entering Today’s Date
Tip
To enter today’s date as a static entry, press
Ctrl+Shift+; (semicolon). To enter the current
time as a static value, press Ctrl+Shift+: (colon).
Depending on the Regional and
International settings of your computer,
your system may display differently, such as
displaying only the last two digits of a year.
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